Kelsey Grammer Advocates For Marsy’s Law In Illinois

Kelsey Grammer’s sister’s murderer was eligible for parole earlier this year, but was denied. Grammer testified against his release. Due to the way the Illinois Constitution is written, a crime victim’s family member in Illinois in a position similar to Grammer may not be properly notified about a killer’s chance for release. Tell all your friends to watch for Kelsey on TV and ask them to vote Yes!

Actor Kelsey Grammar Encourages “Yes” Vote On IL Victims’ Rights Ballot Measure

– Illinois Review

Actor Kelsey Grammer may be best known for the roles he’s played in the television series Cheers and Frasier; but starting Monday, you’ll see him on airwaves with a more somber tone encouraging Illinois voters to vote ‘yes’ for the Crime Victims’ Bill of Rights. Grammer’s passionate involvement with this issue stems from the most horrific tragedies of his life. Grammer’s father, Frank Grammer, was murdered in 1968. Seven years later, his sister, Karen Grammer, was raped by four men and murdered in Colorado.

Grammer’s sister’s murderer was eligible for parole earlier this year, but was denied. Grammer testified against his release. Due to the way the Illinois Constitution is written, a crime victim’s family member in Illinois in a position similar to Grammer may not be properly notified about a killer’s chance for release.

There is no recourse if proper notifications are not given, but the constitutional amendment to the Crime Victims’ Bill of Rights (also known as Marsy’s Law) will change that if enough voters support it in the upcoming General Election on November 4, 2014.

Grammer was not paid for making the ad promoting the measure. Opponents say that the measure will open the way for more lawsuits and trial attorney work. Marcy’s Law proponents disagree.

“We hope Kelsey Grammer’s involvement will raise awareness about the need for Illinoisans to vote ‘yes’ for the Crime Victims’ Bill of Rights, which will enhance the safety of crime victims and give them the appropriate opportunity to participate in the judicial process,” said Jennifer Bishop-Jenkins, director of Marsy’s Law for Illinois.  “Crime victims and their surviving family members are entitled to various rights under clearly established law, but rights such as those to be notified of court proceedings and to deliver an impact statement at sentencing are too often ignored.”